"It should be visceral and exciting. It should be a dramatic experience. It should be thrilling."*

ARCH+ #195

Posted: November 24th, 2009 | Author: dk | Filed under: Architecture | 7 Comments »

GRÜN: die Farbe des Islam
 Stadtpolitik zwischen Religion und Modernisierung

 // GRÜN: die Farbe des Geldes 
Wohnungsbau zwischen Selbsthilfe, Green Money und Greenback

 // GRÜN: die Farbe der Zugänglichkeit
 Istanbul zwischen Segregation und neuen Landschaften

 // GRÜN: die Farbe der Natur 
Stadterneuerung mit ökologischem Gestus

 // GRÜN: die Farbe der Hoffnung 
Auf der Suche nach einer zeitgenössischen Architektur.

Contact
ARCH+ Verlag GmbH
Kurbrunnenstr. 22,
52066 Aachen

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About
Arch+ widmet sich seit vier Jahrzehnten kontinuierlich dem Experiment in Architektur und Städtebau. Angesiedelt zwischen Architektur (Arch), Stadt, Kultur und Medien (+) lotet Arch+ vierteljährlich die Grenzen der sich wandelnden Disziplinen in Theorie und Praxis mit intellektueller Neugier aus. Als letzte von Großverlagen unabhängige, konzeptuelle Architekturzeitschrift in Deutschland ist Arch+ einzigartig und dient als ein Forum der Auseinandersetzung. Arch+ ist Zeitschrift, Internetplattform, Projekt.

Jedes Arch+ Heft ist einem besonderen Thema gewidmet, das im Wechselspiel von Artikeln und Projekten entfaltet wird. Die Heftthemen sind immer auch als Transfer oder Brückenschlag zwischen verschiedenen Wissensbereichen konzipiert. Sie integrieren aktuelle Diskussionen aus den Sozial- und Naturwissenschaften, Ökonomie, Philosophie und Kunst in das Arbeitsfeld des Architekten, sei es bei der Entwicklung neuer Wohnkonzepte, Organisationsformen der Arbeit, urbanistischer Modelle, bei Problemen des Umgangs mit Mobilität, Natur und Landschaft, bei der Neudefinition von Bauaufgaben und -typen oder auch bei Fragen der Formgebung und Raumwahrnehmung und des Umgangs mit Material.

www.archplus.net


Elephant Magazine / The Launch Issue

Posted: November 22nd, 2009 | Author: dk | Filed under: Art, Culture | 15 Comments »

ISSUE 1 Highlights: PETER SAVILLE on design Vs art // Fernando Gutiérrez on how the greatest things come from two people talking // The New Collage Movement sticks in the mind // Make popcorn online with Universal Everything’s Matt Pyke & Rafael Rozendaal // A lesson in bike polo // Hell yes: we’ll have text, type, painting & all (Liz Collini, Chris Tosic, Pietro Sanguineti) // North Wave: a new generation of Scandinavian fashion designers (Henrik Vibskov, Carin Wester, Whyred, Julia Hederus, Hope, Won Hundred) // Boris Hoppek’s naughty notebooks // Robert Nicol’s paranoid vignettes // Image, Time, Data, or the work of Minako Abe // Misake Kawai learns from Charlie Chan // Gianpaolo Pagni’s graphic paintings // Mike Perry lets the images do the talking // Unit Editions: Spin’s Tony Brook and Adrian Shaughnessy tell us how to start a publishing company // Creative City Guide: things to do in Sao Paulo when you are not dead, featuring stunning work by Tuca Vieira, Ana Starling, Paula Ordonhes, Pedro Inoue and some of Sao Paulo’s hottest artists // Photography by Giles Revell

Editor-in-chief: Marc Valli (Magma)
Design & Art Direction: Matt Willey (Studio8)
Publisher: Frame (Amsterdam)
Release date: 17th of November, 2009
Quarterly, 280x 200 mm, 208 pages

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About

The Art & Visual Culture Magazine

Something strange has happened to the art world. Haven’t you noticed it? We live in a divided world. On the one side, you have the art world proper, on the other, what has so far been known as applied arts, or commercial art, while the most interesting work seems to be happening in the middle: when photographers, architects and graphic and fashion and all kinds of designers manage to transcend their initial brief and start thinking like artists, when artists wander outside the confines of the museum and gallery environment and become aware of trends and start thinking like designers… when creatives are not afraid of engaging with new technologies and webmasters not afraid of engaging with art history… when graphic novels become as complex as novels and novels as graphic as comics…. Not to mention all the art forms that fall directly into the gap: illustration, graffiti art, film…. Are they art, or commercial art? Some may ask, when the question should be: but who cares?

This division does not reflect the reality (and the richness) of the visual arts scene. More seriously, this division has meant that a lot of the best work has gone right under the radar. And it is this vast and vital space in the middle, with its vibrant culture and endlessly changing scene, that is the subject of ELEPHANT.

Direct, sincere and multi-disciplinary, Elephant looks for its ethos in the time before the ‘art world’ and the ‘creative industries’ took over, a time when artists didn’t value their work according to the auction prices, but by the reaction of their peers to their ideas.

With over 200 pages of visual content, Elephant aims to have more depth and breadth than any other visual art magazine. It digs deeper, ceaselessly asking and enquiring into creative trends and art movements and innovative techniques. In recent years, creative individuals have started to react against the corporate nature of things, taking initiative into their hands and starting new independent ventures. Elephant looks at how people do that. How do they go about starting a new publishing venture? How do they then move from publishing their own comics to featuring them in national newspapers? How do they turn their personal interests and design skills into hugely popular websites? How do they turn their obsessions into global trends? These questions are particularly relevant as we wake up to this post credit-crunch period. Elephant visits art and design studios, sits by desks, steps on graffiti artists’ toes, disturbs rehearsals and interrupts takes, rides fixed-gear bikes and plays with the latest computer games. The ELEPHANT is always in the room.

Have a look: Elephant Magazine #1


Kilimanjaro #9 / I LOVE WE

Posted: November 16th, 2009 | Author: dk | Filed under: Culture | 19 Comments »

Featuring: ‘POINT BLANK’ by beloved William S Burroughs // Extracts from ‘LUCKY KUNST’ by Gregor Muir and the exploration of identity // ARTWORK by William S Burroughs.

Contact
Editorial and Advertising enquiries

editor@kilimag.com

Subscription

https://www.bruil.info/kilimanjaro

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About
Kilimanjaro – a vibrant printed space dedicated to visual culture and editorial experimentation. Kilimanjaro’s aim is to generate an environment in which ideas reason with visual pleasure.
Contributors stem from different art diciplines including fashion, photography, illustration, fine art and collage.

“By looking at Kilimanjaro, we want to reach people’s hearts and minds - making you think and feel about positive and negative topics with a positive attitude. The most important thing is to be open and realize the true meaning behind the works and possibly take some action… Our dream is to set up Kilimanjaro scholarships in the future. Art is still considered as a hobby for rich people in many countries and we want to give the kids a chance … Kilimanjaro is a project of Love.” (Olu Michael Odukoya)

Winner of the outstanding achievement in photography and magazine, new print 2006 - D&AD
Something to be seen with - Vogue
50 most influential things in the media - Esquire magazine (no. 30)
Highly creative space - Creative Review
Awakens the curiosity and complicity of the reader - B-Guided, Barcelona
It is huge, it’s cool and you will definitely love this size of magazine - www.pingmag.jp - Japan Online
Avant garde - Financial Times
Collector magazine must have kilimanjaro - Viewpoint

www.kilimag.com


grafik #179

Posted: November 16th, 2009 | Author: dk | Filed under: Graphic Design | 16 Comments »

Contents: TALENT - Niki Pilkington, Andrew Gilmore // PROFILE - Uwe Loesch // SPECIAL REPORT - In-House Design // HOW TO BE GREEN - The fifth instalment of your eco design guide // LOGOFORM - Rob Brearley // LETTERFORM - Prem Krishnamurthy // VIEWPOINT - We’re coming to yours for dinner. What’s on the menu?

Contact
Grafik
104 Great Portland Street
London W1W 6PE
UK

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Grafik is an independently published, monthly graphic design magazine serving the international design community.

Aiming to produce unbeatable coverage of groundbreaking new design, it showcases the cream of both cutting edge and commercial graphic design, providing a platform for photography, art, typography, illustration, new media, fashion, technology and advertising.

www.grafikmagazine.co.uk


AMUSEMENT #6 The Bugged Issue

Posted: November 3rd, 2009 | Author: dk | Filed under: Video Games | 10 Comments »

AMUSEMENT is out this week in news stands, a new_issued completely bu#gged with two di//ferent covers // Articles, photos, layout, paper : the who!e mag&zine is conceived as if a huge number of inƒormatic failurzzz had happened during it$ conception ù`$^ù`ù^`^ // This issue will @llow readers, in the coming weeks, to access an interactiv e+perience developed by artist Pierre Vanni for amusement // The issùùùùùùùùe will offer a huge number of ¶hotographic and visu@l innovat!ons -’200 pages °f nerD culture, gaming, technologies, numeric art, gadgets÷… $ù

Contact
AMUSEMENT
63 rue de la roquette
75011 Paris
France
contact@amusement.fr

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About
The time has come for a landmark video game magazine. Transversal, curious, thoughtful : AMUSEMENT redefines the video game magazine with style and precision. Cultural and political references as well as surprising artistic connections provide readers of this thematic quarterly with a unique view of the gaming world. Geared towards those who are passionate about video games and who want reliable and hot off the press information as well as towards amateurs too often disappointed by over-specialized gaming magazines, AMUSEMENT envisions itself as the go-to magazine for information on the most significant media of this century.

Since its launch, AMUSEMENT has gathered writers from publications such as The New-York Times, Wired, Vanity Fair, The Guardian, Vogue, ArtPress, Le Monde…

AMUSEMENT looks for opportunities to expand in english speaking territories. If you think they should, get in touch for editorial or business purposes and send an email.

www.amusement.fr